FAMILIES WE’VE ASSISTED


*8,595 Families Assisted *13,594 Pets Spayed/Neutered

Get Free Spay/Neuter!
You must live in the following zip codes:

75116, 75134, 75203, 75207, 75208, 75210, 75211, 75212, 75215, 75216, 75217,
75223, 75224, 75226, 75227, 75228, 75232, 75233, 75236, 75237, 75241, 75249, 75253

Select one of the following Spay/Neuter providers below

Come to the
Let’s Fix This FREE
Spay/Neuter Event!

Friday, March 2nd and Saturday, March 3rd, 2018

The SPCA of Texas and Spay Neuter Network, along with support from Operation Kindness, will offer FREE spay or neuter surgery, microchipping and vaccinations to pets of people living in 23 Southern Dallas zip codes.

Kiest Park – first come, first served
3080 S Hampton Rd, Dallas,
TX 75224 Client check-in at
7:30 and 8:30 a.m.

*Note Kiest Park Location:
Pets must be less than 60lbs
and less than 7 years of age.
Other locations have no restrictions
on age or weight.

Can’t Make it to Kiest Park?

Four other stationary clinics will also be open,
BUT YOU MUST MAKE AN APPOINTMENT –

SPCA of Texas stationary clinics:

Mary Spencer Spay/Neuter and Wellness Clinic
4830 Village Fair Drive, Dallas, TX 75224

Myron K. Martin Spay/Neuter and Wellness Clinic
2400 Lone Star Drive, Dallas, TX 75212

Click here to make your appointment online
or call: (214)742-7722


Spay Neuter Network stationary clinics:

Crandall: 102 E Trunk St, Crandall, TX 75114
Dallas: 2223 S Buckner Blvd #203, Dallas, TX 75227

Click here to make your appointment online
or call: (972) 472-3500

SIGN-UP BELOW FOR EVENT REMINDERS ONLY!

DO NOT USE THE FORM BELOW FOR PET EMERGENCIES! - Please contact a vet or Das Animal Services

YOU CAN NOT SIGN-UP BELOW FOR SPAY/NEUTER APPOINTMENTS – Click here and make free Spay/Neuter appointments above

WHY SPAY/NEUTER?

Every litter of puppies adds to animal overpopulation and therefore roaming dogs.

Benefits of Spaying and Neutering:

  • Reduce Number of Roaming Dogs & Dog Attacks
  • Prevent Female Dogs from Going into Heat
  • Avoid Care and Expense of Puppies
  • Avoid Fees & Penalties
  • Reduce Animals Suffering in the Street
  • Male and Female Dogs will Likely Live Longer
  • Greatly Reduce Risk of Cancer in Dogs

Spaying and Neutering is the way to FIX our dog problems.

SPAY/NEUTER MISCONCEPTIONS

MYTH:

Females should have one litter before spaying.

TRUTH:

The best time to spay a female is before her first heat. This also greatly reduces the threat of breast cancer.

MYTH:

Behavior and personality are altered after surgery.

TRUTH:

Changes in behavior are positive. These include reduction of territorial spraying, less fighting, and less urge to roam.

MYTH:

Animals become fat and lazy after surgery.

TRUTH:

In most cases, animals become fat and lazy because they’re overfed and inactive.

MYTH:

Males don’t need to be neutered because they don’t have litters.

TRUTH:

Un-fixed males and females are the cause of overpopulation.

HOW TO AVOID DOG ATTACKS:

If you see a pack of roaming dogs:

  • Avoid eye contact
  • Remain silent
  • DO NOT RUN
  • Keep your hands down at your side
  • Stand with the side of your body facing the dog (never turn your back)
  • Once the dog loses interest, slowly back away until they are out of sight

If you are being attacked:

    • Put anything (your purse, bag or jacket) you have to put between you and the dog to protect yourself.
    • If you are knocked down, curl into a ball with your head tucked in and your hands over your ears and neck. Do not move and be silent.
    • When you get to a safe place, immediately wash any wounds with soap and water. Seek medical attention, especially:If the wound is serious. [Uncontrolled
      bleeding, loss of function, extreme pain,
      muscle or bone exposure…etc]
      If the wound becomes red, painful, warm or
      swollen, or if you develop a fever.
      If it has been more than 5 years since your
      last tetanus shot and the bite is deep.

If you see roaming dog(s) or to report a bite/attack, please call 311 or (214) 670-3111

 

For an attack in progress, please call 911.

In either case, please try and have a description of the dog, the breed or type of dog and the details of the incident.